The Latest

Aug 19, 2014 / 53,188 notes

professor-pigeon:

I googled ‘swimming pigeon’ once and I still haven’t recovered from this picture

image

(source)

(via pvnda-ws)

4gifs:

Mario is a jerk. [video]
Aug 19, 2014 / 47,062 notes

4gifs:

Mario is a jerk. [video]

(via pvnda-ws)

omfg partial derivatives of a summation of a log of a summation of a product of conditional probabilities. 

"introduction" to artificial intelligence my ass.
Aug 18, 2014 / 1 note

omfg partial derivatives of a summation of a log of a summation of a product of conditional probabilities.

"introduction" to artificial intelligence my ass.

Aug 18, 2014 / 2 notes
Aug 11, 2014
Aug 6, 2014 / 19,058 notes
Aug 6, 2014 / 50 notes
Aug 6, 2014 / 1,324 notes
izzysfood:

Spinach and Artichoke Fondue
Aug 6, 2014 / 59 notes
fastcodesign:

"Game Of Thrones" Now Has A Subway Map
Aug 6, 2014 / 326 notes
I have found that if you love life, it will love you back.
Aug 6, 2014 / 2,602 notes
Aug 6, 2014 / 2,926 notes

tastefullyoffensive:

"Hold on, it’s cloudy, let’s do one more with the flash." [x]

Aug 6, 2014 / 531,426 notes

zoeuhura:

A+ parenting courtesy of the Turner family

(via ruinedchildhood)

Aug 6, 2014 / 112,652 notes
teded:

Although the coelacanth itself isn’t a land walker, its fins do resemble those of its close relatives who first hauled their bodies onto land with the help of these sturdy, flexible appendages, acting as an evolutionary bridge to the landlubbers that followed. Over millions of years, that transition lead to the spread of all four-limbed animals, called ‘tetrapods’, like amphibians, birds, and even the mammals that are our ancestors.
From the TED-Ed Lesson The coelacanth: A living fossil of a fish - Erin Eastwood
Animation by James Price
Aug 6, 2014 / 80 notes

teded:

Although the coelacanth itself isn’t a land walker, its fins do resemble those of its close relatives who first hauled their bodies onto land with the help of these sturdy, flexible appendages, acting as an evolutionary bridge to the landlubbers that followed. Over millions of years, that transition lead to the spread of all four-limbed animals, called ‘tetrapods’, like amphibians, birds, and even the mammals that are our ancestors.

From the TED-Ed Lesson The coelacanth: A living fossil of a fish - Erin Eastwood

Animation by James Price

(via scinerds)